Using data and research to support your action

When making an objection to a new licence application, or a licence renewal application, it helps to have good relevant data about alcohol-related harm, and about the locality.  Below are a few places to get useful information to inform your action.

Healthspace

http://www.healthspace.ac.nz/maps/maps_Alcohol.html

Healthspace allows people to investigate a number of key indicators of alcohol-related harm.  You can find local data on health outcomes, alcohol related traffic crashes, and licences. 

Data are available at District Health Board level for:

  • Hospitalisations wholly attributable to alcohol
  • Prevalence of self-reported hazardous drinking
  • Injury outcomes of alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes
  • Reported alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes

Data are available at Territorial Authority (council) level for:

  • Hospitalisations wholly attributable to alcohol
  • Injury outcomes of alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes
  • Reported alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes
  • Licence density per 10,000 adults
  • Licence density per 100km2 land area
  • Alcohol licence counts

Data are available at Auckland Local Board level for:

  • Hospitalisations wholly attributable to alcohol
  • Licence density per 10,000 adults
  • Licence density per 100km2 land area
  • Alcohol licence counts

Data are available at Census Area Unit level for:

  • Licence density per 1,000 adults
  • Licence density per 10km2 land area
  • Alcohol licence counts

Police Victimisation Data

https://www.police.govt.nz/about-us/publications-statistics/data-and-statistics/policedatanz

Policedata.nz is a portal that makes a wide range of police data available to the public.  It may take a while to learn to navigate but you should be able to find information about police events in your local area, and over certain periods of time.  The data available does not provide information on whether each event was alcohol-related.  Start with the Crime Snapshot, and then look at victimisations by time and place to see more detail about where and when crimes occurred across New Zealand.


Index of Multiple Deprivation

http://www.imd.ac.nz/NZIMD_Single_animation_w_logos/atlas.html

The Index of Multiple Deprivation is a set of tools for identifying concentrations of deprivation in New Zealand.  It measures deprivation at the neighbourhood level in local areas with an average population of 712.  The IMD uses routinely collected data from government departments, census data and methods comparable to current international deprivation indices to measure different forms of disadvantage. It is comprised of 28 indicators grouped into seven domains of deprivation: Employment, Income, Crime, Housing, Health, Education and Access to services.


Census QuickStats

http://archive.stats.govt.nz/Census/2013-census/profile-and-summary-reports/quickstats-about-a-place

The census can provide demographic information about communities all over New Zealand.  The census allows us to look at the whole country, territorial authorities, right down to local areas called Census Area Units.  We can find information on age, sex, ethnicity, employment, income, family structure, education.


Mashblock NZ

http://www.mashblock.nz/

Mashblock provides a user friendly way to explore publically available demographic statistics at levels of regional councils, territorial authorities, local boards, census are units, and meshblocks.  Available data includes NZ Deprivation Index 2013, usual resident population count, breakdowns of age, gender, ethnic group, religious affiliation, and income.  The website uses Census 2013 data from Statistics New Zealand.  Locations can be searched by address or located on a map.


Alcohol Notices (Auckland region only)

https://www.alcoholnotices.co.nz/

Alcohol Notices provides an efficient way for licensees and applicants to publically notify their application for a new licence, or for a renewal of an existing licence.  Community members can sign up for a daily alerts of public notices, or can search notices by date, area, and trading name.  If you are outside of Auckland check with your local council for the best way to keep up to date with public notification of licence applications.


Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority

https://www.justice.govt.nz/tribunals/licences-certificates/arla/

The Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority (ARLA) is the body that hears appeals when a party is unhappy with a District Licensing Committee decision.  They also hear appeals to provisional local alcohol policies, and maintain a database of alcohol licences and managers’ certificates.  It may be useful to search decisions of the Authority, or find details about specific licences.

It is also possible to search District Licensing Committee decisions for some areas:

Auckland: http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZDLCAK/

Hamilton: http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZDLCHAM/

Porirua: http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZDLCPOR/

Waipa: http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZDLCWP/

Wellington: http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZDLCWN/


Find a District Licensing Committee hearing (Auckland)

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/have-your-say/hearings/find-hearing/Pages/find-district-licensing-committee-hearing.aspx

This page provides details of upcoming and recent DLC hearings.  If you click on the link “See the hearing documents” you may be able to access the agenda for the hearing and also the decision of the committee once available.  Other councils may have similar pages to keep communities informed.


Companies office

https://companies-register.companiesoffice.govt.nz/

In determining the suitability of an applicant, it may be wise to search the names of the directors involved in a licence application, and assess if they have been involved in other companies.  If they are or were involved in other companies, there may be clues as to the applicant’s suitability, for instance if they were involved in a licenced premises with poor track record on enforcement operations.