Trends in hazardous drinking

In 2017/18,around 1 in 5 NZ adults were hazardous drinkers (est. number 775,000 or 19.8% of New Zealand adults 15 years and above).

  • 27.3% of males and 12.7% of females were classified as hazardous drinkers.

For information on the prevalence of hazardous drinking, click the button HAZARDOUS DRINKING

Comparison between subgroup (adjusted by age / sex / ethnic group):

  • Men were significantly more likely to drink hazardously than women.
  • Māori men/women were significantly more likely to drink hazardously than non-Māori men/women.
  • All persons/women living in the most deprived neighbourhoods were significantly more likely to drink hazardously than all persons/women living in the least deprived neighbourhoods.
  • Asian men/Asian women were significantly less likely to drink hazardously than non-Asian men/women.

Changes in hazardous drinking over time

As noted, changes in the NZ Health Survey only permit comparisons in hazardous drinking between the following surveys:

Overall changes in hazardous drinking

From 2006/07 to 2011/12, the proportion of adults classified as hazardous drinkers significantly decreased from 18.0% to 14.9%. Large reductions were noted in adolescents and young adults. By 2015/16, most of the positive reductions made between 2006/07 and 2011/12 had been lost (except among young people). Rather, many groups had a higher prevalence of hazardous drinking in 2015/16 than in 2006/07 (i.e. Māori women, persons of European/other ethnicity, 35-44 year olds, 45-54 year olds, and 65-74 year olds).

Since 2015/16, the overall prevalence of hazardous drinking has stabilised in the overall population - from 20.8% in 2015/16 to 19.8% in 2017/18. During this period, no significant changes in hazardous drinking have occurred in any group characterised by age, sex, or ethnicity.

Women are becoming a higher proportion of hazardous drinkers

The proportion of all hazardous drinkers that are women increased from 28.5% in 2011/12 to 31.6% in 2015/16.

Significantly more Māori women are drinking hazardously in 2015/16 (29.4%) than in 2006/07 (24.2%). From 2015/16 and onwards, there have been no significant changes in hazardous drinking in Māori women in the past three years of comparable surveys (i.e. 2015/16, 2016/17, 2017/18).

Changes in hazardous drinking by age-group

From 2006/07 to 2011/12, large reductions in hazardous drinking were noted in adolescents (15-17 year olds) and young adults (18-24 year olds). Both groups maintained their lower levels of hazardous drinking, and by 2015/16 the prevalence of hazardous drinking was significantly lower when compared to 2006/07. However, the prevalence remained unacceptably high. Click this button for more information on TRENDS IN ADOLESCENT DRINKING.

Older groups moved in a different direction. There have been significant increases in hazardous drinking over time among older age groups in New Zealand. Following declines in hazardous drinking between 2006/07 and 2011/12, the prevalence of hazardous drinking increased from 2011/12 to 2015/16. These increases were substantial among the age-group of 45-54 years, 55-64 years and 65-74 years.

Therefore, all of the positive reductions in drinking that had been achieved between 2006/07 and 2011/12 were lost by 2015/16. Of particular concern, the level of increase was so great that some age groups (35-44yrs, 45-54yrs, 65-74yrs) had significantly higher levels of hazardous drinking in 2015/2016 than in 2006/07.

Click this button for more information on DRINKING TRENDS IN OLDER ADULTS

Since 2015/16, there have been no significant changes in hazardous drinking in the past three years of comparable surveys (i.e. 2015/16, 2016/17, and 2017/18).

Changes in hazardous drinking by ethnic group and neighbourhood deprivation

Persistent inequities remain for Māori and deprived population. From 2006/07 to 2011/12, the proportion of hazardous drinkers decreased in most of the ethnic groups. By 2015/16, the positive reductions made between 2006/07 and 2011/12 had been lost. Hazardous drinking among Māori women significantly increased in 2015/16 when compared to 2006/07.

The ratio of inequity in hazardous drinking is the highest for Māori women and for women living in neighbourhoods with high deprivation (in comparison to the relevant reference group).


DRINKING IN NEW ZEALAND